Saturday, July 15, 2017

What is the way to get rid of mobile phones?

Disconcerting or disrupting phone sets will cause environmental damage

Mobile phone usage in Bangladesh has been in the last two decades. As the number of such users is increasing every year, the new mobile set is coming in the hands of consumers. But the number of old, canceled or lost mobile sets is also increasing with the scales.
However, these canceled phones can be very risky for environment and human health.
What is the speed of the phone?
There are now around 15 million mobile phone users in Bangladesh And about three million mobile phones are being imported every year. The number of canceled phones is also increasing at the same time. But what is the speed of these phones? I asked some residents of Dhaka.
One was saying, where he kept his old phone, and I do not remember.

A private company called asso is saying that e-waste is increasing day by day using mobile phones
Another said, after the phone was damaged, the boy gave it as a toy. One says that the phone was in the drawers for a while after buying a new phone. Throwing the battery after it's damaged.
The concerned people say the life expectancy of each phone is two years old. Low-cost phones have fewer life span.
After research on e-waste, Shahriar Hussain, technical adviser of a private company named Asdo, says that if three million phones are imported annually, then it will be assumed that the same number of phones are being canceled. And these canceled phones are creating serious threats for the environment.
Asda officer Shahriar Hussain said that the amount of e-waste from the mobile phone was created two to three years ago, but now it has doubled. Our research says that two lakh metric tons of e-waste are produced every year in Bangladesh. Its 25 to 30 percent is from mobile phones
Shahriar Hossain says, "The amount of e-waste that was created from mobile phones two to three years ago, but now it has doubled. Our research says that two lakh metric tons of e-waste are produced every year in Bangladesh. Its 25 to 30 percent is from mobile phones. "
But how harmful it is for the environment or for human health?
Mr. Hussain says, "If these abandoned phones mix with the environment, in many ways it will pollute the environment, and also by food chain it also returns to the human body. There are various types of heavy metal in each set. There are lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium and arsenic. If they enter the human body in some way, they cause harm to the health. Of course it will cause physical harm in many ways. ''
He says, "In the developed countries such mobile phones set up vendor companies are forced to buy again. Many times when buying the new set, returning the old, some money is available. In Bangladesh, such a system will be started. Then the e-waste of mobile phone sets will be reduced. For this reason, the government has to take initiative and call vendors to force it. ''

Consolidated and spoiled these phones have taken an initiative to re-process and the country's largest mobile phone operator Grameenphone
Recently, the mobile phone operator of Grameen Phone, the country's largest mobile phone operator, took an initiative to delete and destroy these phones. A box is placed at their customer service center, where anyone can give their canceled phone. Which will then be re-processed according to the rules.
I asked the chief corporate affairs officer of the company Mahmud Hossain, how are they responding?
Mahmud Hussain says, "We have found that a large number of mobile phone sets are unused or damaged, which are harmful for the environment. But there is no such initiative to get out of this loss. Since we are involved in this industry, we felt an urgent need to come forward to raise awareness about this. But we think that not only will we be alone, but all citizens have to understand, it is also their citizenship responsibility. ''
Grameenphone official Mahmud Hussain says that if people realize that their unused mobile phone sets are harming the environment, the reason for its loss is that it can be called a process to create that awareness.
He says, "I have not received much response, I will not say it. Not many of the sets have been submitted, but it is actually an attempt to raise awareness. Three million phone sets are imported every year. Actually I think 20/25 crore phone sets may have been unused. If people realize that their unused mobile phone sets are harming the environment, the reason for its loss is that it can be called a process to create that awareness. "
He does not have to spend an extra cost for that, he said


The Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission said they are thinking of making a policy
The concerned people say, despite the huge number of mobile phones sold in Bangladesh every year, the buyer or seller, among others, has not yet created awareness about expired phone. Companies that sell mobile phones are also not willing to take responsibility for their cancellation phones. Environmental workers claim that a policy can solve this problem, so that the seller will be forced to return the lost phones to the customers.
BTRC Chairman Shahjahan Mahmud asked the telecom sector regulator, what do they think about the issue?
BTRC chairman Shahjahan Mahmud says, "When the use of a phone is over, we should do that wherever we do not leave it at a certain place. Besides, if the old phone is returned, he should get a price, he will also have to do it. Although no action has yet been taken. We are certainly thinking about making a policy about this. But only the BTRC will not do this, only with some organizations or organizations including the Department of Environment, those who have this idea will have to be involved in formulating this policy.
The concerned people say that the number of mobile phone sales and sales are increasing, the number of cancellation phones is increasing. As a result, if the importance of these electronic waste management is not given importance now, then the future of big environmental pollution is going on. Source: BBC 

No comments:

Post a Comment